Bug Art Wednesday: Garden Centipede

Garden Centipede

Garden Centipede

The Garden Centipede can be found in the soil or under leaves where it is moist.

They are a rusty orange colour and are about 25mm long and move very fast with their many legs.

The Garden Centipede can get into tiny spaces as their body is very flexible. Centipedes are predators and have venomous fangs to catch their prey.

Don’t’ worry, they are not harmful to people!

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Space Art Monday: Jupiter June Bug

Jupiter June Bug

Jupiter June Bug

Who lives on Jupiter?

There is a lot of gas on Planet Jupiter so maybe this Jupiter June Bug might live there. Who knows!

Jupiter is the fourth brightest object in our solar system.

Only the Sun, Moon and Venus are brighter. It is one of five planets visible to the naked eye from Earth.

So be sure to look out for it.

The Juno Space Mission is on its way to Jupiter and will arrive July 2016.

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Bug Art Wednesday: European Earwig

European Earwig

European Earwig

You can find these European Earwigs in your garden. They are harmless and don’t bite. Even though it looks like they have two big pinchers.

They like to eat plants and especially lettuce.

They are two toned in colour; the lower half is dark brown and the upper half of their body is light brown and they a have a shiny shell. They are about 5 to 25 mm long.

They were introduced to Canada from Europe back in 1919. At one time people thought that Earwigs would crawl into your ears while you slept!

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Space Art Monday: moon bug

Moon Bug

Moon Bug

Has anyone seen a Moon Bug? This is just a guess as to what a Moon Bug might look like.

It has an amazing nose that can smell water miles under the surface!

Also, on the afternoon of Thursday, October 23rd, the Moon will pass in front of the Sun. What we’ll see is a partial solar eclipse.

Get ready to watch the Moon eat the Sun!

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Ocean Art Wednesday: orb-weaver spider

Orb Weaver Spider

Orb Weaver Spider

It is spider season! Seeing lots of spiders busy building webs and hanging out in the trees and bushes. This spider is called the Orb-Weaver spider, it is about 11mm long and has distinctive white markings on its back.

These spiders make the classic “orb” webs that are flat with radiating spokes and a spiral of silk connecting them together. Making spider webs is instinctive for spiders just like smiling and yawning is for people! Some web strands are sticky and others are not and the spider knows just how to get around while other bugs get stuck.

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Ocean Art Wednesday: whirligig beetle

whirligig beetle

whirligig beetle

The Whirligig beetle is amazing. It spins around at high speeds using two powerful front legs. It can dive under water to catch food. Also, it has wings so it can fly to another pond if need be.

The Whirligig beetle has eyes that are actually split in two. One half looks up into the air, and the other half can see what is going on in the water below.

If another bug tries to eat the Whirligig beetle it will get a mouthful of something that tastes like rotting fruit.

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Space Art Monday: Capella critter

Capella critter

Capella critter

The night sky is changing with the seasons now that autumn has arrived.

The brilliant star Capella above the northeast horizon is a sign of cooler nights to come. Capella is in the constellation Auriga  also known as the Charioteer. It is shaped like a face under a pointed cap.

In another few weeks the constellation Orion and its neighbours will be dominating the evening sky.

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